Peer Pressure: Why We Feel It, How to Overcome it, and Can It Be Positive

Peer Pressure: Why We Feel It, How to Overcome it, and Can It Be Positive

Peer pressure is something most people will experience at some point or another in their lives. Whether you’re a teenager, young adult or an adult in any stage of life, peer pressure can make its presence known in a variety of ways. Peer pressure is simply the influence that one person has on another person when it comes to making decisions about things like dressing, behaving and even thinking about certain things. Peer pressure can be good and bad, depending on what type of peer pressure it is and how we respond to it. It can also feel like peer pressure when someone is just giving us advice that we don’t want to hear. Let’s take a look at why we feel peer pressure, how to handle peer pressure and if there are ever times where peer pressure can be positive for us.

  

What Is Peer Pressure?

Peer pressure is the desire or compulsion to conform or fit in with a group of peers. It’s the social influence that one person has on another person when it comes to making decisions. Peer pressure can be bad: when friends insist that you do things that you really shouldn’t do, like putting others’ health or safety at risk. It can also be good: when friends make you feel confident enough to try things you normally wouldn’t do. It’s all about how you react to it and how you use that influence. Peer pressure can be internal, when you’re trying to conform to an image of who you think you are. Or, it can be external, like when your friends are trying to get you to do something you’re not comfortable with. Peer pressure is different for everyone: some people feel it more than others, and some might not ever experience it at all. It can be as simple as trying to fit in or it can be as severe as someone trying to get you to do something you don’t feel comfortable with. You may not always recognize it, but you’ll likely experience it at some point in your life.

 

Why Do We Feel Peer Pressure?

There are a few different reasons why we might feel peer pressure, but the general consensus is that it’s a natural thing to feel. We’ve been experiencing some form of peer pressure since we were young children and it’s likely that we’ll experience it throughout our entire lives. We feel peer pressure because we want to fit in, we want to be accepted, we want to be liked, we want to be thought of as cool and we want to learn from those around us. We feel peer pressure because we want to belong to a group of people who are like-minded and share the same interests as us. We want to be connected to others who feel the same way we do, who want the same things we want and who understand what we’re going through.

 

How to Overcome Peer Pressure

The best way to overcome peer pressure is to first identify it. When you feel like you’re being pressured to do something you don’t want to do, take a moment to step back and assess the situation. Ask yourself: “Why do I feel like I need to do this?” “What do I really want?” “Why do I want what I want?” Getting in touch with your emotions is the best way to understand what you’re feeling and why you’re feeling it. Once you’ve identified why you feel the pressure, you can decide how to proceed from there. If you’re being pressured to take part in something that’s not safe or healthy for you, you can speak up for yourself. Let your friend or peers know that you would like to do something else instead. If you’re being pressured to conform to an image of who you think you are or who you don’t think you are, you can let your friends know that you’re not comfortable with that and why. Let them know what your boundaries are and encourage them to be respectful of your choices.

 

When Can Peer Pressure Be Good?

Sometimes we feel peer pressure when we’re trying to make a decision. We might want to do one thing, but our friends are trying to influence us to do something else. When your friends are trying to influence you, it’s important to remember that they probably want what’s best for you. They want you to make the most out of your experience and they want you to be happy. When you feel peer pressure like this, it’s important to first identify what you’re feeling in that moment. Once you figure out what you’re feeling, you can then decide whether or not you want to let your friends influence you. If you feel pressured to make a decision, it’s important to remember that you don’t have to make it right away. Take some time to yourself to think over your options and make a decision that feels right to you.

 

How to Develop a Thick Skin When It Comes to Peer Pressure

If you find that you’re feeling peer pressure more often than not, it may be time to evaluate your current situation and the company you’re keeping. If you feel like you’re being pressured in a variety of ways and from a variety of people, take a step back and ask yourself if that’s where you want to be. You can improve the way you handle peer pressure by first finding the root of the problem. You can do this by journaling or by speaking with a professional. Once you know what’s triggering you, you can work on changing that. There are a few things you can do to help you overcome peer pressure: - Get in touch with your emotions - This is important because it will help you identify when you’re being pressured and why you’re feeling that way. - Set boundaries - This will help you protect yourself from toxic relationships and will help you feel confident in who you are and what you want. - Do what makes you happy - This will help you avoid peer pressure because you’ll be more focused on what you want instead of what others want.

 

Conclusion

Peer pressure is something that most people will experience at some point or another in their lives. Whether you’re a teenager, young adult or an adult in any stage of life, peer pressure can make its presence known in a variety of ways. The best way to overcome peer pressure is to first identify it. When you feel like you’re being pressured to do something, take a moment to step back and assess the situation. From there, you can decide how to proceed. With practice, you can learn to better navigate these situations and make decisions that are best for you.